Results for Navigation

There are 44 resources for Navigation in the library.

Articles and Papers

Ambient Signifiers: How I Learned to Stop Getting Lost and Love Tokyo Rail
by Ross Howard (9/19/2006)
Subject: Information Architecture - General, Interface Design, Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: When navigating a complex system - be it a website or a large transport network - it is easy to get lost. Ross Howard points out how subtle signifiers can make a big difference.
Note: Boxes and Arrows

Classification, Facets, and Metaproperties
by Martin Frické, Scott Hill (1/2011)
Subject: Faceted Classification, Information Architecture - General, Navigation, Ontologies
Language: English
Abstract: The paper argues that second order properties or metaproperties are essential for classification and navigation of information, for example for faceted classification and the navigation it generates. The paper observes that metaproperties, are not accommodated well within such standard schemes as Z39.19, description logics (DLs), and the formal ontologies OWL, BFO, and DOLCE.
Note: Frické, M. (2011). Classification, Facets, and Metaproperties. Journal of Information Architecture. Vol. 2, No. 2. [Available at http://journalofia.org/volume2/issue2/04-fricke/]

Depth vs Breadth in the Arrangement of Web Links
by Lianaeli Mtei, Panayiotis Zaphiris (1997)
Subject: Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of depth and breadth of web site structure on the user response time.

Designing for Information Foragers: A Behavioral Model for Information Seeking on the World Wide Web
by James Kalbach (2000)
Subject: Information Science, Information Seeking Behavior, User Centered Design
Language: English
Abstract: This paper explains and elaborates a behavioral model for understanding how people look for information on the Web. The first half briefly reviews a wide range key research to provide a broader context for understanding human information seeking behavior and a starting point for further exploration. The second part proposes a model for organizing design ideas based on this research.

Designing Screens Using Cores and Paths: Designing from the inside out
by James Kalbach, Karen Lindemann (8/20/2012)
Subject: Information Architecture - Practices, Navigation, Process & Techniques
Language: English
Abstract: If you can place your core offering firmly at the center of your design, then all other elements in the site help both the users and the business reach their goals. Kalbach and Lindemann show how the Core+Paths method keeps the design focused on your goals.
Also available at: www.boxesandarrows.com/files/banda/core-and-paths/Cores_and_Paths_Diagramm_final-.pdf

Designing Site Navigation
by Dmitri Kirsanov (1997)
Subject: Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: Even with the best possible design of any single page, your site will fail to attract visitors if not equipped with a neat, consistent, and intuitive navigational interface. This article addresses the main issues designers confront when building effective navigation tools.

Designing Web Applications
by Margaret M. Meehan, Hal Shubin (1997)
Subject: Interaction Design, Navigation, User Centered Design
Language: English
Abstract: This paper discusses several common navigational problems and techniques for avoiding them in designing Web applications. Although the focus is on applications rather than on purely informational sites, you can use these guidelines for designing anything on the Web.

Do You Hear What I Hear?: Or Why It May Not Matter That Users Still Ignore Breadcrumbs
by Kath Straub (10/2004)
Subject: Breadcrumbs
Language: English
Abstract: A review of recent research on breadcrumb navigation.

Effective View Navigation PDF Document
by George W. Furnas (11/26/1996)
Subject: Information Scent, Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: In view navigation a user moves about an information structure by selecting something in the current view of the structure. This paper explores the implications of rudimentary requirements for effective view navigation, namely that, despite the vastness of an information structure, the views must be small, moving around must not take too many steps and the route to any target must be discoverable.

Faucet Facets: A Few Best Practices for Designing Multifaceted Navigation Systems
by Jeffrey Veen (2002)
Subject: Faceted Browsing, Faceted Classification
Language: English
Abstract: Jeffrey Veen discusses the best practices for designing navigation systems for architectures based on faceted classification in the areas of facet selection, winnowing interaction, and results rendering. Examples are included for each.

Four Modes of Seeking Information and How to Design for Them
by Donna Maurer (3/14/2006)
Subject: Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: Information-seeking behavior varies from situation to situation. Donna Mauer explores different ways in which users look for information and offers tactics for accommodating them.
Note: Boxes and Arrows

From Data to Wisdom: An Interview with Paco Underhill
by Liz Danzico (11/28/2006)
Subject: Cognitive Science, Information Seeking Behavior, Research Methods
Language: English
Abstract: How can the simple act of watching people make better products? Paco Underhill, the foremost expert in behavior market research, talks about the pyramid of knowledge, worshipping at the altar of the CEO, and the need to supersize or specialize.
Note: Boxes and Arrows

I'm Feeling Lucky : The Role of Emotions in Seeking Information on the Web PDF Document
by James Kalbach (2003)
Subject: Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: Absent from current web design theory and practice is a pattern for emotive criticism. This article outlines a framework for understanding users' emotional states as they seek information on the web. It is inspired largely by Carol Kuhlthau's (1991, 1993, 1999) work in library services, which is adapted to web-based search systems.

Information Foraging
by Stuart K. Card, Peter Pirolli (1999)
Subject: Classics, Information Retrieval, Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: Information Foraging Theory is an approach to understanding how strategies and technologies for information seeking, gathering, and consumption are adapted to the flux of information in the environment. The theory assumes that people, when possible, will modify their strategies or the structure of the environment to maximize their rate of gaining valuable information.

Information Wayfinding, Part 1: A Not-So-New Metaphor
by Tyler Tate (4/1/2013)
Subject: Information Architecture - Theory, Information Scent
Language: English
Abstract: rowsing the Web. Surfing the Net. Navigating a Web site. Traversing a hierarchy. Going back. Scrolling up and down. Returning home. We have seen such metaphors throughout our history of using computers to interact with information. Haphazard though they may seem be, these metaphors highlight a universal reality of human psychology: we perceive the world—both physical and digital—in spatial terms.

Information Wayfinding, Part 2: Elements of the Information Environment
by Tyler Tate (5/6/2013)
Subject: Information Architecture - Theory, Information Scent, Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: Part 2 of a series on information wayfinding: Tyler scrutinizes the nature of information environments by investigating their most fundamental elements. In doing so, he subtly reframes the way we think about interacting with information on Web sites, in mobile applications, and in other digital experiences.
Note: Tate, T. (May 6, 2013). Information Wayfinding, Part 2: Elements of the Information Environment. UX Matters. Retrieved from http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2013/05/informatio n-wayfinding-part-2-elements-of-the-information- environment.php

Information Wayfinding, Part 3: Designing for Wayfinding
by Tyler Tate (3/14/2014)
Subject: Information Architecture - Theory, Information Scent, Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: How can we make ever-growing volumes of information accessible and useful to people without overwhelming them? In the third and final installment of a series on information wayfinding, Tyler looks at how people move through information environments, the behavior of wayfinding, and outlines a set of guidelines for building Web sites and applications that enable people to make sense of continually expanding volumes of information without their becoming overwhelmed.
Note: Tate, T. (March 14, 2014). Information Wayfinding, Part 3: Designing for Wayfinding. UX Matters. Retrieved from http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2014/03/informatio n-wayfinding-part-3-designing-for-wayfinding-1.php

Interview with Louis Rosenfeld, Author of Search Analytics (7/8/2011)
Subject: Information Scent, Searching
Language: English
Abstract: As search engine optimization (SEO) professionals, we focus on keywords, aboutness, and information scent. What keyword phrases best describe a webpage, a graphic image, and/or a video? How can we ensure that information scent gets stronger from search engine results page (SERP) to a web page on our websites? Shari Thurow interviews Louis Rosenfeld for SearchEngineLand.com, part one of two in the series.

Is Navigation Useful?
by Jakob Nielsen (2000)
Subject: Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: This article addresses common aspects of navigation, including generic links, structural navigation, local navigation, and information structure.

Location, Path & Attribute Breadcrumbs
by Keith Instone (2003)
Subject: Breadcrumbs, Guides & Collections
Language: English
Abstract: A collection of resources from Keith Instone on location, path & attribute breadcrumbs including a one page example for each type of breadcrumb, a PDF for the 2002 IA Summit Poster, and a "Open Discussion on Web Navigation" presentation. Also included are links to research on the topic.

Metaphors We Surf the Web By PDF Document
by Paul P. Maglio, Teenie Matlock (1998)
Subject: Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: The way people think about the World-Wide Web (WWW) has implications for the way that they navigate it. In this paper, we discuss the nature of people’s metaphorical conception of the WWW, as gathered from interviews with beginning and experienced web users. Based on linguistic data, we argue that people naturally think of the web as a kind of physical space in which they move, although information on the web is not physical, and web users do not actually move. Nevertheless, such metaphorical thought is motivated by the same basic image schemata that people rely on to mentally structure everyday life.

On Uncertainty in Information Architecture, Journal of IA PDF Document
by James Kalbach (4/2009)
Subject: Information Architecture - Theory, Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: Uncertainty, in general, is a fundamental aspect of human activity and underlies much of our decision making. The notion of uncertainty in information seeking, in particular, dates back to Shannon and Weaver (1949) and since then has been investigated in many forms. Kulthau's (1993) work on information uncertainty is perhaps the most extensive. Through two specific examples, this article proposes uncertainty as a unifying heuristic in information architecture. Measurements of uncertainty can serve a diagnostic function in both the design and evaluation of information technologies and user interfaces.
Available Translations:
Italiano at iainstitute.org/it/translations/001186.php

Part Two: Interview with Louis Rosenfeld, Author of Search Analytics
by Shari Thurow
Subject: Information Scent, Searching
Language: English
Abstract: In Part 1 of my interview with renowned information architect Lou Rosenfeld, author of Search Analytics for Your Site: Conversations with Your Customers, he defined site search analytics (SSA), suggested keyword patterns to monitor, and outlined some differences between web searchers and site searchers. In Part 2, we discuss relevancy scores, site search analytics that can improve navigation, some insightful tests you can use on your own site.

Site Navigation: A Few Helpful Definitions
by Indi Young (2002)
Subject: Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: Provides some basic definitions surrounding site navigation that will help your team with building a shared vocabulary for more effective collaboration.

Site Navigation: Keeping It Under Control
by Indi Young (2003)
Subject: Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: Discusses two rules for keeping your site navigation under control: Keeping navigation to three levels and not making product names part of navigation.

The Myth of "Seven, Plus or Minus 2"
by James Kalbach (2002)
Subject: Cognitive Science, Information Design, Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: This articles proposes that the optimal number of menu items cannot be reduced to the generalized "Magic Seven, Plus or Minus Two" (7±2). The author proposes that instead, when planning a site information architecture, the two most important considerations are breadth versus depth and the display of information.

The Problem(s) with Sitemaps
by Peter Van Dijck (1999)
Subject: Supplemental Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: Explores the problems seen in sitemaps and how to create an effective sitemap.

The Psychology of Navigation
by Jesse James Garrett (2002)
Subject: Information Architecture - Theory, Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: Jesse James Garret explores the psychology behind how users make navigational choices as they navigate through "information spaces" and how information architects can use this information when crafting the navigational experience.

Transitional Volatility in Web Navigation
by David R. Danielson (6/2002)
Subject: Navigation, Research Methods
Language: English
Abstract: Danielson's Master's Thesis on Usability Metrics and User Behavior

Web Navigation: Resolving Conflicts between the Desktop and the Web
by Carola Fellenz, Jarmo Parkkinen, Hal Shubin (1998)
Subject: Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: This paper summarizes a workshop at CHI98 that focused on navigational problems caused by differences in navigational models between the desktop and the Web.

Web Page Layout: A Comparison Between Left- and Right-justified Site Navigation Menus
by Tim Bosenick, James Kalbach (4/28/2003)
Subject: Primary Navigation, Web Design
Language: English
Abstract: The usability of two Web page layouts was directly compared: one with the main site navigation menu on the left of the page, and one with the main site navigation menu on the right. This research questions the current leading Web design thought that the main navigation menu should be left justified.

Web Site Architecture 101
by Rudy Limeback (1999)
Subject: Primary Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: Outlines three easy steps for determining the information architecture or navigation scheme of a site on which you are working.

What Do Web Users Do? An Empirical Analysis of Web Use PDF Document
by Andy Cockburn, Bruce McKenzie (2000)
Subject: Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: This paper provides an empirical characterisation of user actions at the web browser. The study is based on an analysis of four months of logged client-side data that describes user actions with recent versions of Netscape Navigator. In particular, the logged data allows us to determine the title, URL and time of each page visit, how often they visited each page, how long they spent at each page, the growth and content of bookmark collections, as well as a variety of other aspects of user interaction with the web. The results update and extend prior empirical characterisations of web use. Among the results we show that web page revisitation is a much more prevalent activity than previously reported (approximately 81% of pages have been previously visited by the user), that most pages are visited for a surprisingly short period of time, that users maintain large (and possibly overwhelming) bookmark collections, and that there is a marked lack of commonality in the pages visited by different users.

What Happens When Context Thwarts and Information Architects Vision?
by Thom Haller (2/2012)
Subject: Contextual Navigation, Information Architecture - General, Writing for the Web
Language: English
Abstract: from ASIS&T Bulletin, February/March 2012 edition.


Books

Beyond Book Indexing
by Diane Brenner, Marilyn Rowland (2000)
Subject: Indexing, Supplemental Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: How to get started in web indexing, with a back-of-the-book style A-Z index as a supplemental navigation tool.

Information Seeking in Electronic Environments
by Gary Marchionini (1997)
Subject: Information Retrieval, Information Seeking Behavior, Interface Design
Language: English
Abstract: Discusses both searching and browsing interfaces to aid users in their information seeking. Includes research on information-seeking efforts and strategies, describes browsing strategies and systems that support them, as well as trends and strategies for the future.


Presentations and Podcasts

Age Group Differences in World Wide Web Navigation
by Sherry E. Mead, Beth Meyer, Richard A. Sit, Victoria A. Spaulding (1997)
Subject: Conferences & Meetings, Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: This paper, presented at the CHI 97 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, discusses the influence of age on Web surfers' browsing behavior.

IA Summit 2012: Groundhogs in the Source Code: Navigation as Cross-Channel Sense Making (a conversation with Andrea Resmini)
by Jeff Parks (3/28/2012)
Subject: Conferences & Meetings, Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: Today on Radio Johnny, Jeff Parks talks with Andrea Resmini from the 2012 IA Summit in New Orleans about his presentation, Groundhogs In The Source Code: Navigation as Cross-Channel Sense Making. Andrea describes the ultimate goal of navigation is that of helping the end user understand the places and spaces in which they interact. Drawing on Hollywood movies like Groundhog Day and Source Code – and classic stories such as Dracula as metaphors – Andrea takes listeners on a quest to help them find their way through a variety of interactions.

Revisitation Patterns in World Wide Web Navigation
by Saul Greenberg, Linda Tauscher (1997)
Subject: Conferences & Meetings, Information Seeking Behavior
Language: English
Abstract: This paper, presented at the CHI 97 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, addresses users' revisitation patterns to Web pages. The others then propose a design base for history mechanisms in Web browsers.

Showing the Context of Nodes in the World-Wide Web
by James D. Foley, Sougata Mukherjea (1995)
Subject: Conferences & Meetings, Supplemental Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: This paper talks about a method to show the context of nodes in the World-Wide Web, and the authors' design proposal for showing the users the context of their overall information space.


Tools

Core+Path Template PDF Document
by James Kalbach, Karen Lindemann (8/20/2012)
Subject: Information Architecture - Practices, Navigation, Process & Techniques
Language: English
Abstract: This PDF outlines the Core+Path Methology proposed by James Kalbach and Karen Lindemann. If you can place your core offering firmly at the center of your design, then all other elements in the site help both the users and the business reach their goals. Kalbach and Lindemann show how the Core+Paths method keeps the design focused on your goals.


Web Sites and Resources

Maps of Web Sites
by Martin Dodge
Subject: Supplemental Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: This site presents examples of Web site maps used for navigation that rely heavily on information visualization.

Site Navigation Guide
Subject: Guides & Collections, Navigation, Supplemental Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: This online guide provides to articles and resources for creating an easy-to-navigate Web site. The site also includes a special section on supplemental navigation.

Web Indexing
by Heather Hedden
Subject: Findability, Indexing, Supplemental Navigation
Language: English
Abstract: Website of the Web Indexing Special Interest Group - American Society of Indexers. Resources for building A-Z back of the book style indexes.


View only results in: